I eat it everyday. About five to seven slices of it or more.

I douse it in olive oil, or spread some butter on it, or hummus. Other days I spread avocado or cream cheese. Sometimes, I just eat it plain or use it to soak up the sauce from my meal plate, or leftover traces in the pot I prepared the meal in.

Of course I make sandwiches, lots of them. Peanut butter and jelly, ham and cheese, smoked salmon with chives and cream cheese, grilled cheese, or chicken breast with an assortment of toppings. I love it!

It’s the versatility of bread I appreciate but also the variety in taste. Here in Krakow bakeries have their own variation to similar varieties but they also have their own unique breads and the ingredients vary widely depending on tastes. I really like testing the waters and trying different ones but I have established favorites now. That doesn’t mean I stick to them permanently. I do venture out of the consistent choices to get new taste in the mix or one I have forgotten about.

Is learning anything like eating bread? Can a draw any similarities from these two?

There’s no question that with language learning we find our groove, comfort zone, structure or pattern and stick with it. Once we dig in it is incredibly hard to break that habit we’ve spent so much time developing. I think that as teachers we need to encourage our students who struggle with improving their communication, to break from those old habits and venture into the new. No question, it’s difficult but provides rewards.

I don’t know if people appreciate bread as much these days. But for me it’s an essential element in the food experience, one that compliments almost any dish I eat. The trick, I think, is choosing the right kind for the appropriate dish or occasion. Language can be like that too.

Now where’s the pesto spread?

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